How To Stop Your Child From Begging (In The Grocery Store)

by | Jan 30, 2019

Dear Freaky Mom,

Do you dread going to the grocery store because you know that your son will ask you for something in every aisle?  

Do you dread going to the store with him because he begs for Skittles every time you’re in the check out line?  

Do you wish you could leave him at home and go to the store by yourself?  

(Note to Moms…that last thing I asked? That’s true of every Mom, whether their child begs or not. It’s a generally known fact that going to the grocery store without kids is a much easier task. You’re not alone in wishing that you could go by yourself.)   

But, back to the point.  

Does your son beg for a treat, a special candy, his favorite drink every time you’re in the store?  

If so, you’re normal.  So is your son.  You and all the other Moms have experienced this at least once.  

“At least once?” you say?  “My son does that every single time!  I hate going to the store with him!  It’s miserable!  He starts begging and if I say no, he launches into a complete melt down!  It’s awful!”  

Are you wondering how I could have even insinuated that there are some Moms who only go through this once?  

Well, keep reading and you’ll find out how it’s possible.  

*Here is a solution:  

On the way to the grocery store, tell your son that you have 10 things on the grocery list.  

Tell him that you will not be purchasing anything except what is on the list.  

Because he’s six years old, in kindergarten and learning to read, put him in the cart with the list and a pen.  

Each time you put something from the list in the cart ask him to cross that item off the list.  

When you get to the checkout line and he begins begging for Skittles, ask him, “Are Skittles on the list?”  

If he continues begging, explain that, as you discussed in the car, you are only getting things that are on the list and, since Skittles are not on the list, you won’t be getting them.  

Undoubtedly, if he’s not used to you standing your ground in the check out line, this may cause some initial growing pains.    

The first time you implement a new rule of no tolerance for begging and teach him that all you are buying is what’s on the list, he most likely won’t like it and quite possibly will launch into his usual temper tantrum. 

The difference?  This time the temper tantrum has a light at the end of the tunnel…and it’s not Skittles.

The light at the end of the tunnel is the lesson he is learning:  You will not respond to his begging in the grocery store. 

The light at the end of the tunnel is your future at the grocery store:  Less stress, no more begging, fewer temper tantrums. 

When he resists the new rule? Stay Strong! Don’t give in, don’t bribe him with something else, just reiterate the lesson that you explained in the car. 

We will only be buying what’s on the list. Are Skittles on the list? Then no, we won’t be getting Skittles. 

Each trip to the store will become easier.  Maybe today’s tantrum is 5 minutes long.  Probably next time’s tantrum will only be 3 minutes long.  And the third time you go to the store and say No To The Begging, instead of a tantrum, he might only pout. Eventually, the begging will stop! 

Soon, your son will be a joy to have with you because he is learning to read, enjoying his responsibility of crossing items off the list and has learned begging in the store is not something that happens in your family. 

The alternative?  Let the Skittles train of begging and temper tantrums crash into and run you over each time you give in. 

You got this Mom and all us other Moms are with you. 

You’re not alone.  

Good Job Mom!

Lindsey

*P.S.  I am a firm believer that there are many solutions to a problem.  This is just one of them. Do you have another solution?…Leave a comment below!

P.P.S. Have you seen the Consequence of the Week Program?  It’s right >>>here. 

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